Passion Flower Growing Guide
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Passion Flower Growing Guide

What is Passion Flower?

Passion flower is native to the southeastern United States and Central and South America. It’s been traditionally used to help with sleep. Where they are hardy, passionflowers are usually trained on a trellis, fence, or other vertical structures. In regions where they are not hardy, passionflower plants are often grown in pots and moved indoors for the winter.

How to Start Growing Passion Flower

Plant after the last frost in partial to full sun. Passion flower should be given a deep watering immediately after planting. Passion flower plants love warm weather and may need winter protection in cooler regions. To prevent your plant from dieback, bring it indoors as temperatures drop. Plant on a trellis or along a wall to protect against wind conditions. Mulching also can protect the roots in winter in cold areas and keep the soil from eroding.

Did You Know?

Spanish missionaries gave the flower its name, likening the structure of the flower to elements of the story of the Passion of the Christ. The 10 petals and sepals represent the 10 apostles (not including Judas and Peter) and the corona symbolizing the crown of thorns. The flower’s five anthers symbolize Jesus’ wounds; the three stigmas symbolize the nails of the cross. The tendrils represent the whips used by Jesus’ tormentors.

Our Favorite Passion Flower to Grow

Passion Flower Plant Spacing

In-Ground Planting

Row Spacing - 5 to 10 feet

Plant Spacing - 8 feet

Planting Depth - 1/2 inch

Raised Bed Planting

Row Spacing - 5 to 10 feet

Plant Spacing - 8 feet

Planting Depth - 1/2 inch

Passion Flower Soil, Irrigation, & Fertilizer

Soil Requirements to Grow Passion Flower

  • Loose, well-draining soil
  • pH between 6.0 and 7.5
  • Rich in organic materials
  • Good quality compost added to the soil

Passion Flower Irrigation Requirements

Passion Flower plants need at least 1 inch of water per week. Using drip irrigation is always recommended to be sure that your plants are getting moisture directly to their root system. If you’re using conventional overhead watering techniques, try and use something like the Dramm Watering Can and water and fertilize at the base of the plant to keep moisture off the leaves.

Raised Bed Fertilizer Schedule

Several Weeks Before Planting

Test your soil at your local extension office.

At Time of Planting

After adjusting soil pH to 6.1 – 7.5, mix 1 1/2 cups per 10 ft. of row or ¼ cup per plant of Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer with your soil.

2 Weeks After Planting

1 cup Hoss Micro-Boost Micronutrient Supplement with 5 gallons of water. Each plant gets 1 quart of the solution next to the plant stem. Repeat every 4 weeks.

4 Weeks After Planting and Every 4 Weeks

¼ cup Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer per plant evenly spread around plant.

In-Ground Fertilizer Schedule

Several Weeks Before Planting

Test your soil at your local extension office.

At Time of Planting

After adjusting soil pH to 6.1 – 7.5, mix 1 1/2 cups per 10 ft. of row or ¼ cup per plant of Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer with your soil.

2 Weeks After Planting

1 cup Hoss Micro-Boost Micronutrient Supplement with 5 gallons of water. Each plant gets 1 quart of the solution next to the plant stem. Repeat every 4 weeks.

4 Weeks After Planting and Every 4 Weeks

¼ cup Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer per plant evenly spread around plant.

Passion Flower Pest & Disease Protection

Insects

Organic Controls

Horticulture Oil
Aphids, Flea Beetle, Whiteflies, Spider Mites, Thrips

Bug Buster-O
Aphids, Flea Beetles, Whiteflies, Moths, Armyworms

Monterey BT
Caterpillars, Cabbage Loppers

Take Down Garden Spray
Aphids, Flea Beetle, Whiteflies, Moths

Diatomaceous Earth
Cutworms, Ants, Slugs

Sluggo Plus
Slugs

Treat as needed using label instructions.

Common Diseases

Organic Controls

Complete Disease Control
Gray Mold, Leaf Spots, Anthracnose, Powdery Mildew

Treat as needed using label instructions.

Harvesting, Preserving, and Storing Passion Flower

When & How To Harvest Passion Flower

For maximum potency, passion flower should be harvested while the plant is in bloom, during the mid to late summer months. When gathering passion flower, only harvest the parts above the ground not the root. Cut the vine off at ground level to allow the rot system to stay in tact for future growth. Gather the larger more mature plants leaving plenty of younger smaller plants to seed the area for future harvest. For drying purposes and to preserve the green color gather passion flower in the afternoon once the morning dew has dried. After harvest, remove all foreign matter and spread in a thin layer immediately. Passion flower herb can be dried outdoors though it needs to be dried out of the sun. When possible, however, dry indoors in a dark, well ventilated place. It will be dry in three to seven days.

Storing & Keeping Passion Flower

Place the vines carefully into a cardboard box or burlap bag for storage in a dry area until ready to sell or use. Do not store the vines in plastic or it will mold. Store the dried blooms and leaves in glass containers.

Peep Our Passion Flower!

Passion Flower Growing Tips & Tricks

Pruning

Passion flower is low maintenance during the growing season and do not need deadheading, but they will need pruning. Pruning is done more to keep the size of the passionflower vine in check while also encouraging fuller growth.

Passion Fruit

Passion flower plants also grow passion fruits, which are similar to pomegranates in color on the outside and orangish to yellowish on the inside when ripe. They are about the size of a chicken egg. It tastes sweet, citrusy, tangy flavor.

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