Yarrow Growing Guide
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Yarrow Growing Guide

What is Yarrow?

Yarrow is an herbaceous perennial featuring small bunches, or “heads”, of flowers. Yarrow is a great low-maintenance addition to your garden. It self-sows easily and thrives in well-drained soil with plenty of sun but can adapt to a variety of situations. Yarrow is considered a “cure-all” herb for its many medicinal uses and properties, and the herb is drought and deer resistant. It is commonly used as a medicinal herb that can treat the bleeding of minor wounds, swollen or cramping muscles, reducing fever, or to help with digestion. It is also used as an astringent.

How To Plant Yarrow

Plant yarrow in spring after the last frost. Yarrow reaches maturity after 120 days. Keep seed in constant moisture with temperatures of at least 65°F. Use stakes to support yarrow plants if needed.

While it is possible to grow yarrow in partial shade, it is recommended to grow in full sun, as shade can make yarrow grow leggy. Choose a site with average soil as overly rich soil can lead to overgrowth. Yarrow performs best in well-drained soil. It thrives in hot, dry conditions. Yarrow will not tolerate soil that’s constantly wet, and so a loamy soil is recommended.

Did You Know?

Yarrow was supposedly used during the Trojan war to stop bleeding, even by Achilles himself.

Our Favorite Yarrow to Grow

Yarrow Planting Information

In-Ground Planting

Row Spacing - 12 to 24 inches

Plant Spacing - 12 inches

Planting Depth - 1/4 inches

Yarrow Soil, Irrigation, & Fertilizer

Soil Requirements to Grow Yarrow

  • Loose, well-draining soil
  • pH between 5.5 and 7.0
  • Rich in organic materials
  • Good quality compost added to the soil

Yarrow Irrigation Requirements

Yarrow plants need at least 1 inch of water per week till established. Established plants are drought tolerant and should only be watered during droughts. Using drip irrigation is always recommended to be sure that your plants are getting moisture directly to their root system. If you’re using conventional overhead watering techniques, try and use something like the Dramm Watering Can and water and fertilize at the base of the plant to keep moisture off the leaves.  

Raised Bed Fertilizer Schedule

Several Weeks Before Planting

Test your soil at your local extension office.

At Time of Planting

After adjusting soil pH to 5.5 – 7.0, mix 1 1/2 cups per 10 ft. of row or ¼ cup per plant of Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer with your soil.

2 Weeks After Planting

1 cup Hoss Micro-Boost Micronutrient Supplement with 5 gallons of water. Each plant gets 1 quart of the solution next to the plant stem. Repeat every 4 weeks.

4 Weeks After Planting, and Every 4 Weeks

¼ cup Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer per plant evenly spread around plant.

In-Ground Fertilizer Schedule

Several Weeks Before Planting

Test your soil at your local extension office.

At Time of Planting

After adjusting soil pH to 5.5 – 7.0, mix 1 1/2 cups per 10 ft. of row or ¼ cup per plant of Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer with your soil.

2 Weeks After Planting

1 cup Hoss Micro-Boost Micronutrient Supplement with 5 gallons of water. Each plant gets 1 quart of the solution next to the plant stem. Repeat every 4 weeks.

4 Weeks After Planting, and Every 4 Weeks

¼ cup Hoss Complete Organic Fertilizer per plant evenly spread around plant.

Yarrow Pest & Disease Protection

Insects

Organic Controls

Horticulture Oil
Aphids, Flea Beetle, Whiteflies, Spider Mites, Thrips

Bug Buster-O
Aphids, Flea Beetles, Whiteflies, Moths, Armyworms

Monterey BT
Caterpillars, Cabbage Loppers

Take Down Garden Spray
Aphids, Flea Beetle, Whiteflies, Moths

Diatomaceous Earth
Cutworms

Sluggo Plus
Slugs


Treat as needed using label instructions.

Common Diseases

Organic Controls

Complete Disease Control
Gray Mold, leaf spots, Anthracnose, Powdery Mildew


Treat as needed using label instructions.

Harvesting, Preserving, and Storing Yarrow

When & How To Harvest Yarrow

Yarrow is ready to be harvested once the plants become fragrant. The best stage at which to pick yarrow for drying is when the flower heads are mature and the blooms become stiff. Wait until the dew has dried, but before the plants’ essential oils have dissipated in the heat of the day. Harvest yarrow on a warm, sunny day when the plants are in full bloom. Cut the stem just above a leaf node. You can use both the flowers and the leaves. You can dry yarrow in a dehydrator on a low heat setting, or just spread out the herbs on a cookie sheet and dry in a very slow oven. Set the oven as low as it will go so you don’t burn or cook the herbs, and check often. The herbs are “done” when the pieces snap easily and cleanly.

Storing & Keeping Yarrow

To dry the plant, shake off any beetles or bugs that may be on the cut pieces. Then lay out flat or hang in small bundles in a dark and dry area with good circulation. Yarrow can also be dried using a dehydrator. Add your dried yarrow to a storage container and store in a cool, dark place.

You'll Love Our Yarrow!

Yarrow Growing Tips & Tricks

Cut Down for Better Growth

Cut off (deadhead) flowers when they start to fade in mid-summer; this will encourage new bloom growth in your plants. To deadhead your flowers, pinch or cut off the flower stem below the spent flower and just above the first set of full, healthy leaves.

Control the Population

Yarrow self-sows and grows quickly, and so the herb can overtake your yard if not monitored. If your yarrow plant starts to overtake your garden or lawn, dig a hole and pull the yarrow out from its rhizomes.

Grow with Divisions

Yarrow is easily grown from divisions like with seeds. Divide yarrow plants every 3 to 5 years to sustain vigorous, healthy plants. Lift the clumps in early spring or fall and remove any dead stems from the center of the clump. Then, replant in a new location for the best plant growth.

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